Hobbit-spotting

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This week we buried another Presbyterian, a retired minister who knew all the words to the Hippopotamus Song. He saw his death coming and accepted it like all things, the working of a sovereign god who works such things for good. Now he is currently dead, and I don’t expect to see him again in this lifetime.

Let Time be still/ Who takes all things/ Face, feature, memory/ Under his blinding wings. James K. Baxter.

My move into a new house presses ahead. A friend helped me move a gazillion books. I exaggerate, it was about 500. Without moving any furniture it’s beginning to look good. Since it’s a long weekend I hope to move some furniture from downstairs: the rest of my bookshelves, a two-seater sofa, a comfortable chair, and a cane table with glass top and chairs; and on top of that, some drawers from the garage. I hope the cold front coming through doesn’t fraught my ambitions.

I’ve never organised a house warming before. I wonder what to do? I know that house has some theologies to exorcise. At least one reader will understand what I mean when I say Rev. Blobby lived there before me.

It’s nearly the end of June, and I haven’t gone into the University Bookshop to pick up my new calendar for Matariki. The new calendar will begin on Monday.

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Hobbit-spotting

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This week we buried another Presbyterian, a retired minister who knew all the words to the Hippopotamus Song. He saw his death coming and accepted it like all things, the working of a sovereign god who works such things for good. Now he is currently dead, and I don’t expect to see him again in this lifetime.

Let Time be still/ Who takes all things/ Face, feature, memory/ Under his blinding wings. James K. Baxter.

My move into a new house presses ahead. A friend helped me move a gazillion books. I exaggerate, it was about 500. Without moving any furniture it’s beginning to look good. Since it’s a long weekend I hope to move some furniture from downstairs: the rest of my bookshelves, a two-seater sofa, a comfortable chair, and a cane table with glass top and chairs; and on top of that, some drawers from the garage. I hope the cold front coming through doesn’t fraught my ambitions.

I’ve never organised a house warming before. I wonder what to do? I know that house has some theologies to exorcise. At least one reader will understand what I mean when I say Rev. Blobby lived there before me.

It’s nearly the end of June, and I haven’t gone into the University Bookshop to pick up my new calendar for Matariki. The new calendar will begin on Monday.

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When the School of Ministry for the Presbyterian Church ran onsite ministry training at Knox College in Dunedin they had a cluster of houses scattered throughout the north end of Dunedin for cheap rentals for ministry students. Now that the School of Ministry has become the Knox Centre for Ministry and Leadership its ministry students are scattered around the country and they have sold most of the houses off. Yesterday I looked at one of the houses behind the college which they are trying to rent out. It has been vacant since the start of the year. It looked like a good deal for me as I would be on my own, which I’ve never done before and it was next to my workplace at the Presbyterian Archives. So I have signed up for it. The Registrar will give me the key next week. Now I have to move all my stuff across the valley back to Opoho. (Since I don’t drive I’ll be looking for help.) The house is a bit old, but it will have plenty of room for me to spread out.

At the same time our workplace is nearly at the end of its renovations so we can move in. Fancy both these things happening at once!

Hobbit Spotting and Books

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Since Southern Dave has arrived home safely I should list what I found at this years 24-hour book sale.

In order of loot:

Foreign Languages:
TY German Reader; and German Made Simple. Special mention should be made that Southern Dave found a copy of TY New Testament Greek. I already had it in a later edition from Hodder and Stoughton, this was a hardback English Universities Press with the original dust cover. As I have been collecting these books for years, mostly for inspiring imaginary languages rather than learning new languages, this is an appreciated gift.

Nearly New SF:
The Time of the Dark by Barbara Hambly. Got home and found I had a copy on my shelves. In better condition too and I didn’t have to pay 2/6p for it. It’s the third book in that series of which I don’t have a copy of yet.

Dictionaries and Bibles:
The Children’s Bible, arranged by Arthur Mee; and my own copy of Y Geriadur Mawr. Two good finds.

Children’s Literature:
Lots of great finds here this year. I am picking up things I read as a child in the 1970s and that I want to read again: Magic by the Lake by Edward Eager, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Finn Family Moomintroll, the Young Unicorns. Also picked up a copy of Heartease by Peter Dickinson and found it was one of the two books of the Changeover trilogy that I already had, so another one to go into dispose pile. It is The Devil’s Children for which I’m still looking.

Southern Dave tells me that I was looking through the children’s books the Music books were behind me on the stage. This is another area I like to browse closely for the little gems that one can pick up, and I have missed it for the last two years. I will look out for it next time.

Religion:
Breath Becomes the Wind, a history of the Protestant mission to the Karo people of Indonesia. I know the author personally.

Other than that I found a interesting fantasy novel for children in the Novels, which I usually find barren pickings; and I glanced in the specialist books on the mezzinine floor. It was insufferably crowded and hot, and I had been browsing for three hours and was thirsty for something wet. Enough!

In other news I have had some meetings with the Majellanic Urban Tribe. I saw Taniwha at the opening of the Dunedin Combined Archives’ City of Letters display, and later in the same week I met Chris at one of the open lectures held at the Hocken Library, an interesting talk by an archives supporter about childbirth in 19th century colonial letters in New Zealand. I saw Dr. Moorlock in the university capping parades over the last two weekends, I hope he managed to stay awake. Shirley H. was looking for a bus while George Street was closed for the parade and I managed to point her in the direction of an alternative street. The previous time I had seen her she told me about the Tibetan Buddhist display at the Public Gallery and I got along to a couple of evening events there, including a jam session with a Tibetan monk on a flute. I wished Albie could have seen that, he would have loved it.