I took Friday off because I was expecting to be traveling to Cromwell for Southern Presbytery’s annual meeting.  I was waiting at one o’clock to be picked up.  By the time it got to two o’clock I knew something was wrong and it was beginning to rain.  I sent a text to Yew Tree Woman and she phoned me to say that she had contacted my ride and I had got my dates wrong.  The annual meeting is the second weekend in August and not the first weekend.  This is frustrating because it meant I had taken a day’s leave for no purpose and would have to do the same again next week.  I had told everyone that I will be away on Saturday.  All I can do for now is keep breathing.

The day was not a complete write-off as I spent some time on the computer working on the lexicon for my imaginary eclectic language.  I had made some notes on Indo-European words from Gamkralidze and Ivanov’s text book of the proto-language and worked my way through a third of them seeing which of them I could work into my lexicon for the language.  It’s so wonderful living so close to a university library.  I hope I can finish incorporating the list over the weekend.  Then I can return to making notes from the Descriptive Dictionary of Bislama.

Also I got an extra session in at the gym which is nice.  It keeps the knots out of my shoulders.

And today I got to watch the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra playing at the Madrid Royal Theatre on cinema at the Rialto.  They did two of my favorite pieces: Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez from his guitar concertos, I think this is a lesser known piece, which is undeserved; and Sergei Rachmaninov’s Symphony No. 2.  It was a delight to watch these pieces played out under conductor Simon Rattle and the cameras helped to guide the eye to the activity of the orchestra.  I would liked some commentary and interaction that the New York Metropolitan Opera has incorporated into Live on High Definition series.  The concert was still rewarding and I await to see the next one.

Back to reading Michael King’s History of New Zealand.

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