This is the origin of quarrels and complaints – when either equals have unequal shares, or unequals equal shares.

Aristotle

Jesus set aside the purity code when it came to advice on what he ate and who he ate with.  When he set his face to Jerusalem he set aside the purity code when it came to people.  He did not avoid travelling through the Samaritan land unlike other Judeans who would go around it in order to be righteous for participating in the feast.

Lend as though the Jubilee year will not come!

Belousek cited the example of the parables as examples of justice.  I was reminded of an observation made on Malcolm Gordon’s blog One Voice, “the first person Jesus names in his parables is usually the person he wants his listeners to relate too”.  Imagine the difference it would make if we read the parables like this:

The kingdom of god is like this, let’s suppose you’re a man on the road to Jericho when you get beaten by bandits, stripped, and left for dead by the side of the road…

The kingdom of god is like this, let’s suppose you’re a father of two sons, and your younger son comes to you and says “Give me my share of your life-savings now”…

The kingdom of god is like this, let’s suppose you’re the master of a vineyard, and you go out looking for workers for the day…

What if the parables don’t tell us about god, they tell us about how Jesus expects us to act and respond to his call?  Does this become more shocking?

And then the Epistles talk about the justice of god and the faithfulness of Jesus revealed on the cross of Christ to the believers.  I was interested in the word for believers which is ‘the faithing’.  We become, quite literally, the trustees.  Suddenly the whole action of salvation takes on a unity.

There were other things said.  These are the thoughts that inspired me to think.

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